TITLE

Obesity and Surgical Wound Healing: A Current Review

AUTHOR(S)
Pierpont, Yvonne N.; Phuong Dinh, Trish; Salas, R. Emerick; Johnson, Erika L.; Wright, Terry G.; Robson, Martin C.; Payne, Wyatt G.
PUB. DATE
January 2014
SOURCE
ISRN Otolaryngology;2014, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Objective. The correlation between obesity and deficient wound healing has long been established. This review examines the current literature on the mechanisms involved in obesity-related perioperative morbidity. Methods. A literature search was performed using Medline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Internet searches. Keywords used include obesity, wound healing, adipose healing, and bariatric and surgical complications. Results. Substantial evidence exists demonstrating that obesity is associated with a number of postoperative complications. Specifically in relation to wound healing, explanations include inherent anatomic features of adipose tissue, vascular insufficiencies, cellular and composition modifications, oxidative stress, alterations in immune mediators, and nutritional deficiencies. Most recently, advances made in the field of gene array have allowed researchers to determine a few plausible alterations and deficiencies in obese individuals that contribute to their increased risk of morbidity and mortality, especially wound complications. Conclusion. While the literature discusses how obesity may negatively affect health on various of medical fronts, there is yet to be a comprehensive study detailing all the mechanisms involved in obesity-related morbidities in their entirety. Improved knowledge and understanding of obesity-induced physiological, cellular, molecular, and chemical changes will facilitate better assessments of surgical risks and outcomes and create efficient treatment protocols for improved patient care of the obese patient population.
ACCESSION #
100568350

 

Related Articles

  • Bariatric Surgery in the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Morbidly Obese Patients. Fritscher, Leandro G.; Canani, Simone; Mottin, Cláudio C.; Fritscher, Carlos C.; Berleze, Diovane; Chapman, Kenneth; Chatkin, José M. // Respiration;2007, Vol. 74 Issue 6, p647 

    Background: Weight loss has been shown effective in the treatment of the obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome. Regrettably, many obese patients are unable to achieve sustained and useful weight loss by dietary means. Recently, bariatric surgery has emerged as an alternative to treat obesity...

  • Surgically and Conservatively Treated Obese Patients Differ in Psychological Factors, Regardless of Body Mass Index or Obesity-Related Co-Morbidities: A Comparison between Groups and an Analysis of Predictors. Ahnis, Anne; Figura, Andrea; Hofmann, Tobias; Stengel, Andreas; Elbelt, Ulf; Klapp, Burghard F. // PLoS ONE;Feb2015, Vol. 10 Issue 2, p1 

    Objective: For the treatment of obesity, both conservative and surgical procedures are available. Psychological factors are likely to influence the choice of treatment; however, to date, systematic studies that investigate these factors are few in number. The aim of our study was to analyze...

  • A comparative study to evaluate the effect of honey dressing and silver sulfadiazene dressing on wound healing in burn patients. Baghel, P. S.; Shukla, S.; Mathur, R. K.; Randa, R. // Indian Journal of Plastic Surgery;Jul2009, Vol. 42 Issue 2, p176 

    To compare the effect of honey dressing and silver-sulfadiazene (SSD) dressing on wound healing in burn patients. Patients (n=78) of both sexes, with age group between 10 and 50 years and with first and second degree of burn of less than 50% of TBSA (Total body surface area) were included in the...

  • Perioperative management of the obese patient. Brodsky, Jay B. // Revista Mexicana de Anestesiologia;abr-jun2008 Supplement, Vol. 31 Issue Supl1, pS85 

    The article discusses perioperative management of the overweight patient. It notes that the preferred operative approach for obese patients is laparoscopy, since it is linked with less postoperative pain, earlier recovery and lessened risk of postoperative pulmonary complications. It describes...

  • Post-operative complications following bariatric surgery. Brodsky, Jay B. // Revista Mexicana de Anestesiologia;abr-jun2008 Supplement, Vol. 31 Issue Supl1, pS93 

    The article discusses post-operative complications after bariatric surgery. It notes that overweight surgical patients are at greater risk for hypoxemia in the postoperative period compared with normal weight individuals undergoing similar operations. It cites that obesity is an essential risk...

  • Laparoscopic versus Open Obesity Surgery: A Meta-Analysis of Pulmonary Complications. antoniou, Stavros athanasios; antoniou, George athanasios; Koch, Oliver Owen; Köhler, Gernot; Pointner, Rudolph; Granderath, Frank-alexander // Digestive Surgery;Apr2015, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p98 

    The clinical effects of laparoscopy in the pulmonary function of obese patients have been poorly investigated in the past. A systematic review was undertaken, with the objective to identify published evidence on pulmonary complications in laparoscopic surgery in the obese. Outcome measures...

  • Assessing the obese diabetic patient for bariatric surgery: which candidate do I choose? Raffaelli, Marco; Sessa, Luca; Mingrone, Geltrude; Bellantone, Rocco // Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome & Obesity: Targets & Therapy;Jun2015, Vol. 8, p255 

    The worldwide prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising in association with an increasing frequency of overweight and obesity. Bariatric-metabolic procedures are considered as additional therapeutic options, allowing improved diabetes control in most patients. Multiple factors play in concert to...

  • Unpacking the financial costs of "bariatric tourism" gone wrong: Who holds responsibility for costs to the Canadian health care system? Snyder, Jeremy C.; Silva, Diego S.; Crooks, Valorie A. // Canadian Journal of Surgery;Dec2016, Vol. 59 Issue 6, p369 

    Summary: Canadians are motivated to travel abroad for bariatric surgery owing to wait times for care and restrictions on access at home for various reasons. While such surgery abroad is typically paid for privately, if "bariatric tourists" experience complications or have other...

  • Perioperative outcomes of primary renal tumour resections: comparison of in-hours to out-of-hours surgery. Forbes, Connor; Butterworth, Sonia // Pediatric Surgery International;Oct2014, Vol. 30 Issue 10, p1003 

    Purpose: Primary resection is typically performed for children with localised suspected Wilms tumours. Resource limitation may necessitate performing these operations nights and weekends. We hypothesise that outcomes will be worse in patients having nephrectomies out-of-hours (OOH) compared to...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics