TITLE

The role of catecholamines in mesenchymal stem cell fate

AUTHOR(S)
Hajifathali, Abbas; Saba, Fakhredin; Atashi, Amir; Soleimani, Masoud; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Rasekhi, Mahsa
PUB. DATE
December 2014
SOURCE
Cell & Tissue Research;Dec2014, Vol. 358 Issue 3, p651
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells found in many adult tissues, especially bone marrow (BM) and are capable of differentiation into various lineage cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes and myocytes. Moreover, MSCs can be mobilized from connective tissue into circulation and from there to damaged sites to contribute to regeneration processes. MSCs commitment and differentiation are controlled by complex activities involving signal transduction through cytokines and catecholamines. There has been an increasing interest in recent years in the neural system, functioning in the support of stem cells like MSCs. Recent efforts have indicated that the catecholamine released from neural and not neural cells could be affected characteristics of MSCs. However, there have not been review studies of most aspects involved in catecholamines-mediated functions of MSCs. Thus, in this review paper, we will try to describe the current state of catecholamines in MSCs destination and discuss strategies being used for catecholamines for migration of these cells to damaged tissues. Then, the role of the nervous system in the induction of osteogenesis, adipogenesis, chondrogenesis and myogenesis from MSCs is discussed. Recent progress in studies of signaling transduction of catecholamines in determination of the final fate of MSCs is highlighted. Hence, the knowledge of interaction between MSCs with the neural system could be applied towards the development of new diagnostic and treatment alternatives for human diseases.
ACCESSION #
101070636

 

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