TITLE

Bertha Wilson's Legal Legacy

AUTHOR(S)
BROOKS, KIM; DOWNIE, JOCELYN
PUB. DATE
March 2015
SOURCE
Herizons;Spring2015, Vol. 28 Issue 4, p50
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the legal legacy of Canada Supreme Court Justice Bertha Wilson. Topics discussed include the judicial opinions written by Wilson during her appointment and retirement in 1991, the rights and interests of women protected by Wilson in the Morgentaler ruling on January 28, 1988, and the approach of Wilson to equality revealed by his work on the Canadian Bar Association task force.
ACCESSION #
102939805

 

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