TITLE

The Price of Morality. An Analysis of Personality, Moral Behaviour, and Social Rules in Economic Terms

AUTHOR(S)
Gössling, Tobias
PUB. DATE
June 2003
SOURCE
Journal of Business Ethics;Jun2003 Part 2, Vol. 45 Issue 1/2, p121
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The focus of the present study was the rationality of moral behaviour and moral conviction. Assumptions like "morality pays" or "good ethics is good business" are not a priori right. Whether morality as personal conviction is also economically rational or not depends in large part on the institutional setting of a society and the likelihood that immoral behaviour will be sanctioned. The systematic approach to morality thus appears to be political economy and the institutional setting: rules and laws. However, the conditions for morality depend not only on the formal structures but also on the informal structures of rules and sanctions. Hence, the systematic approach to morality is most closely linked with the culture of a society; the efficiency of individual morality depends on social conditions. It is costly for individuals and societies to establish and entertain conditions that set clear incentives for moral behaviour. In this context, moral competencies, learning, and education play a crucial role.
ACCESSION #
10330892

 

Related Articles

  • Beware the 'Boiling Frog Syndrome.'. Pomeroy, Ann // HR Magazine;May2007, Vol. 52 Issue 5, p12 

    The article focuses on unethical behavior in the workplace, and on how it should be handled. A recent research found that ethical misconduct that develops gradually over time tends to go unnoticed and unreported. It stressed the importance of building an ethical culture in a company by providing...

  • Exploitation and Sweatshop Labor: Perspectives and Issues. Snyder, Jeremy // Business Ethics Quarterly;Apr2010, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p187 

    In this review, I survey theoretical accounts of exploitation in business, chiefly through the example of low wage or sweatshop labor. Labor of this kind is often described as self-evident]y exploitative and immoral. But for defenders of sweatshops as the first rung on a ladder toward greater...

  • AN EMPIRICAL STUDY ON AWARENESS LEVELS OF CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY WITH A SPECIAL REFERENCE TO FORD FOUNDATION. PRATHIBA, V.; RAMANA, S. V. // International Journal of Research in Computer Application & Mana;Oct2013, Vol. 3 Issue 10, p38 

    Globally Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) has grown exponentially in the last decade. Today, the companies are ranked not only on the basis of their financial performance but also on their contribution towards the society. If this social responsibility is neglected, then the firm's...

  • SYSTEMIC TARGETED EVALUATION OF INFLUENCE FACTORS UPON FORMATION OF ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE AT AN ENTERPRISE. Zakharchyn, G. M. // Actual Problems of Economics / Aktual'ni Problemi Ekonomìki;Nov2011, Vol. 125 Issue 11, p129 

    The article presents the fundamentals of the systemic targeted evaluation of the influence factors upon the formation of organizational culture and offers the classification of factors, also analyzing the priority of influence between the factors of external and internal environments, the...

  • All change? Cook, Sarah; Macaulay, Steve // Training Journal;Jun2010, p25 

    The article discusses the factors that influence the culture of an organisation and how it can best be changed. It explains why culture should be sometimes changed, and looks at potential problems that change can bring. It explores the things that should be changed in an organization and what...

  • HR must take its chance to drive CSR strategies.  // Personnel Today;3/30/2004, p1 

    HR professionals are ideally placed to lead the corporate social responsibility (CSR) agenda, according to one of the country's leading experts. Ed Williams, head of CSR at Marks & Spencer, and a former HR practitioner, told Personnel Today that the function was crucial in ensuring firms acted...

  • The Relationship between Ethical Climate and Ethical Problems within Human Resource Management. Bartels, Lynn K.; Harrick, Edward; Martell, Kathryn; Strickland, Donald // Journal of Business Ethics;May98, Vol. 17 Issue 7, p799 

    The study examines the relationship between the strength of an organization's ethical climate and ethical problems involving human resource management. Data were collected through a survey of 1078 human resource managers. The results indicate a statistically significant negative relationship...

  • Business ethics: dealing in the gray areas. Skeddle, Ronald W. // Financial Executive;May/Jun90, Vol. 6 Issue 3, p9 

    This article discusses business ethics in American corporations. The increasing pressure for short-term profits can compromise ethical considerations. The author argues that ethics must be embedded into the corporate culture so that it is transmitted to new employees. He contends that large,...

  • Ethical Culture: Most Important Barrier to Ethical Misconduct. Verschoor, Curtis C. // Strategic Finance;Dec2005, Vol. 87 Issue 6, p19 

    This article presents the results of a survey conducted by the Ethics Resource Center, a nonprofit U.S. organization. The survey, named 2005 "National Business Ethics Survey," measures workplace ethics, implementation of formal ethics programs and their impact, and factors that pose risks of...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics