TITLE

A Sweet Sixteen

AUTHOR(S)
Starr, S. Frederick
PUB. DATE
August 2003
SOURCE
National Review;8/11/2003, Vol. 55 Issue 15, p21
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the challenges facing the U.S. forces in the post-Taliban Afghanistan. After dismantling the Taliban regime in Afghanistan, the U.S. will have to meet some immediate challenges including, warlords masquerading as regional leaders, criminal Islamists, heroin trafficking, and general lawlessness. Besides, some long-term challenges, which include severe poverty and a total lack of infrastructure. Amidst all these problems, the author applauds the vigorous measures taken by the U.S., which averted the mass famine that was universally predicted in the dry autumn of 2001.
ACCESSION #
10369869

 

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