TITLE

Court reins in solicitation laws

PUB. DATE
November 1979
SOURCE
Body Politic;Nov79, Issue 58, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that the California Supreme Court has declared that the state's sexual solicitation statute, a law used by police officers to entrap gays, does not meet constitutional standards of specificity as of November 1979. Details of a case which addressed the provisions of the sexual solicitation statute; Revisions applied by the Supreme Court to the statute to meet constitutional standards of specificity.
ACCESSION #
10387060

 

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