TITLE

9/11's Hidden Toll

AUTHOR(S)
Childress, Sarah
PUB. DATE
August 2003
SOURCE
Newsweek (Pacific Edition);8/4/2003 (Pacific Edition), Vol. 142 Issue 5, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on how the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack in the United States has affected Muslim-American women. Discussion of domestic violence as a side effect of the attacks; Factors that have contributed to the rise in domestic violence, according to social-service agencies; Comment of Nora Alarifi Pharaon, psychologist at the Arab-American Support Center in New York City, on why abuse goes unreported in Muslim communities; Reasons that women stay with or return to abusive husbands, according to Sharifa Alkhateeb, president of the North American Council for Muslim Women; Effort of religious leaders to help abused women.
ACCESSION #
10515176

 

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