TITLE

Sudan: Crucial talks to end Africa's longest war

AUTHOR(S)
Mulama, Joyce
PUB. DATE
September 2003
SOURCE
New York Amsterdam News;9/11/2003, Vol. 94 Issue 37, p2
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
International pressure is rising on the government of Sudan and the main rebel movement, the Sudan People's Liberation Army (SPLA), to make peace or risk sanctions. Yielding to the pressure, SPLA leader John Garang and Sudan's first vice president Ali Osman Mohamed Taha, began consultations last Thursday evening in Naivasha, Kenya to salvage the talks, which have already collapsed seven times since last year. The meeting between Garang and Taha followed pressure by the governments of Norway, Great Britain, Italy and the U.S. to end Africa's longest conflict. Deng Alor, governor of south Sudan's Bahr el Ghazal region, confirmed that there has been pressure from the U.S. for a peace agreement to be reached soon. The U.S. government, wary of a possibility of a failed state that may breed terrorism, has warned that it would enforce the Sudan Peace Act if it found that Khartoum, Sudan was not negotiating in good faith. Under the act, Washington would provide the SPLA with $100 million every year for three year, in support of civil administration, communication, infrastructure, education, health and agriculture.
ACCESSION #
10883882

 

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