TITLE

Industry looks for signs of recovery

AUTHOR(S)
FOREMAN, COLIN
PUB. DATE
November 2015
SOURCE
MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;11/11/2015, Vol. 59 Issue 45, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the challenges faced construction contractors due to the political instability and weakening economies across the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC). It provides overview of the Construction Leadership Summit on October 22, 2015 in which company executives expect that negative headwinds of 2015 will continue and will affect the sector. It also mentions the impact of the low energy prices that lead to the cancellation of several projects in the region.
ACCESSION #
111157462

 

Related Articles

  • Saudi Arabia sees biggest expansion.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;9/19/2014, Vol. 58 Issue 38, p38 

    The article reports on construction and development projects in the Gulf Cooperation Council as of September 17, 2014. Topics discussed include the expansion of Saudi Arabia's projects market due to the launch of 10 new projects worth 25.9 billion U.S. dollars, how Saudi Arabia's expansion...

  • Kuwait projects arrest market slide. ROSCOE, ANDREW // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;5/13/2011, Vol. 55 Issue 19, p35 

    The article reports that the projects index in the Middle East region stabilized at 2.52 trillion dollars in the first week of May 2011. The index started declining from 2.63 trillion dollars on January 12, 2011 as a result of anti-government protests in the region. The projects market in the...

  • Kuwait decline pushes down index.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;2/8/2013, Vol. 57 Issue 6, p27 

    The article reports that a drop in the value of Kuwait's construction projects market has resulted in a fall in the Gulf Projects Index. The author notes that Kuwait was not the only Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) market to lose value, citing loses in Bahrain, Oman, and Saudi Arabia's markets....

  • MEED INSIGHT.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;8/13/2010, Vol. 54 Issue 33, p4 

    The article cites a report which details the existing Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) projects sector in 2010.

  • CHASING THE BIG MONEY.  // Finweek;12/14/2006, p70 

    The article reports that the huge flow of money to the Middle East due to high oil prices has launched developments in certain states that are attracting companies and investors worldwide. Building and construction projects in Abu Dhabi, Qatar and Saudi Arabia have just exceeded the $1000bn...

  • IMF warns on GCC overheating risk.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;9/15/2006, Vol. 50 Issue 37, p36 

    The article deals with the economic forecast of the International Monetary Fund for Gulf Cooperation Council states, in September 2006. Global economic growth is expected to remain strong throughout 2006/2007, in spite of high oil prices. Economic growth in the non-oil-exporting countries of the...

  • Conflict weighs on Gulf index.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;9/26/2014, Vol. 58 Issue 39, p42 

    The article informs that Gulf Projects Index has decreased by 0.2 per cent during the week ended September 23, 2014. It is stated that high Speed Railway Network is one of the large project which has been put on hold in the Eastern Route of Iraq. It also presents charts on projects planned or...

  • Stadiums left out amid oil price fall.  // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;3/4/2015, Vol. 59 Issue 9, p7 

    The article reports on the consensus among contractors in Saudi Arabia that vanity projects, such as stadiums and museums would be delayed, due to decline of oil prices.

  • ANALYSIS: Construction spending in GCC to fall. FOREMAN, COLIN // MEED: Middle East Economic Digest;8/31/2012, Vol. 56 Issue 35, p13 

    The article presents an analysis of construction spending in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) in 2012. It states a collapse in spending in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) will result in a 28 percent decline in construction project spending. It mentions that Saudi Arabia is expected to replace the...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics