TITLE

Protection of the Right to Life in Prison

AUTHOR(S)
Olesk, Margot
PUB. DATE
January 2015
SOURCE
Juridica International;2015, Vol. 23, p110
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article explores the protection of the right to life in prison in Estonia under the Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms.
ACCESSION #
111559002

 

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