TITLE

Chapter four: Buying and Selling

AUTHOR(S)
Brinkerhoff, Shirley
PUB. DATE
January 2003
SOURCE
Folk Speech;2003, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This chapter discusses the roots of advertising in the U.S. Long before Madison Avenue perfected the art of the television commercial, and before billboards sprang up by the side of nearly every road in America, the most immediate form of advertising was the street cry. The purpose of the street cry was to advertise the wares available, and each vendor customized his own cry as far as length and style. In "Folklore on the American Land," by Duncan Emrich, the author comments on the different produce and wares offered in American cities. Strawberries, cantaloupe, bananas, blackberries, apples, and garden produce such as okra, cucumbers, squash and tomatoes, all could be had in season from the street vendors. In an era before the electric refrigerator was common in homes, hot summer weather brought out a desire for cold lemonade and ice cream, which only a city street vendor could satisfy. Lemonade in Texas was cried in the street. Later in American history, people peddled cosmetics, brushes, vacuum cleaners, encyclopedia sets, and a variety of other products from house to house, and entire companies were founded and flourished upon the services of these door-to-door salesmen.
ACCESSION #
11191500

 

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