TITLE

Dogging the Wag

AUTHOR(S)
Lucier, James P.
PUB. DATE
October 1998
SOURCE
Insight on the News;10/26/98, Vol. 14 Issue 39, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that United States President Bill Clinton released a number of cruise missiles against terrorist camps in Afghanistan's chemical weapons complex in Khartoum, on August 20, 1998. Amount of money the attack cost taxpayers; What happened the day after the launch; Information on the design of cruise missiles.
ACCESSION #
1178499

 

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