TITLE

NAFTA Slowly Forces US Workers to Uplift Skills

AUTHOR(S)
LaFranchi, Howard
PUB. DATE
October 1998
SOURCE
Christian Science Monitor;10/20/98, Vol. 90 Issue 228, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Newspaper
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports that the North American Free Trade Agreement is making it easier in 1998 for labor intensive industries to build factories in Mexico. How the growth in labor intensive industries will impact United States companies who provide services and skilled manufacturing; Why factories are often built on the US-Mexico border; The move away from the border for some industries; Why towns like El Paso, Texas must prepare for industrial growth in Mexico.
ACCESSION #
1187930

 

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