TITLE

Transnational Terrorism after the Iraqi War

PUB. DATE
October 2003
SOURCE
Military Technology;Oct2003, Vol. 27 Issue 10, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the transnational Islamic terrorism after the U.S.-led military intervention in Iraq. Occurrence of simultaneous suicide attacks killing Americans and Jews; Prevalence of bombings; Proliferation of the al-Qaeda operations.
ACCESSION #
11921181

 

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