TITLE

Would Increased Immigration Benefit Business? Pro

AUTHOR(S)
Gary, Judge Elbert H.
PUB. DATE
July 1923
SOURCE
Congressional Digest;Jul/Aug23, Vol. 2 Issue 10/11, p314
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents views of the author on whether increase in immigration to the U.S. benefit business. He doesn't entertain the opinion that there should be no restriction in regard to immigration laws. On the contrary, he believes there should be restrictions. He doesn't think that immigration laws should permit immigration that could reasonably be construed as inimical to domestic labor of any kind, to the Government or to the public welfare. Restrictions upon immigration should be directed to the question of quality rather than numbers of foreigners coming to the country.
ACCESSION #
12327828

 

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