TITLE

National Policy and Transnational Governance of Climate Change: Substitutes or Complements?

AUTHOR(S)
ANDONOVA, LILIANA B.; HALE, THOMAS N.; ROGER, CHARLES B.
PUB. DATE
June 2017
SOURCE
International Studies Quarterly;Jun2017, Vol. 61 Issue 2, p253
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Many scholars and policymakers see transnational governance as a substitute for lackluster national and international policies, particularly in the context of intergovernmental gridlock or limited state capacity. The bulk of the literature explains sub- and non-state actors' participation in transnational initiatives as a product of, on the one hand, micro-level incentives and, on the other, diffusion processes that create and spread normative and market-based pressures. We argue that such theoretical perspectives overlook the dynamic relationship between national policies and transnational governance. First, we argue that ambitious national policies positively affect sub- and non-state actors' participation in transnational governance. Second, we posit that domestic institutions condition the effects of micro-level incentives and transnational pressures on participation in transnational governance. We test these claims in the climate regime, using an original dataset that, for the first time, measures cross-national participation in transnational climate initiatives across jurisdictions. The results support our expectations. They therefore suggest that we should understand national policies and transnational governance as complements, rather than competitors, to one another. Finally, by showing how and when national policies affect participation in transnational initiatives, we identify important scope conditions for their significance in addressing climate change.
ACCESSION #
125260518

 

Related Articles

  • Marching at the Pace of the Slowest: a Model of International Climate-Change Negotiations. Ward, Hugh; Grundig, Frank; Zorick, Ethan R. // Political Studies;Aug2001, Vol. 49 Issue 3 

    We model international negotiations on climate change. Leaders such as the European Union and the US can make proposals and influence veto players, including other countries and domestic lobbies, who must choose whether to accept or reject proposals. We explain why policy change has been minimal...

  • Second Only to Nuclear War: Science and the Making of Existential Threat in Global Climate Governance. ALLAN, BENTLEY B. // International Studies Quarterly;Dec2017, Vol. 61 Issue 4, p809 

    Climate change moved rapidly up the international political agenda between 1979 and 1988. What explains this shift? Existing explanations focus on how an international epistemic community built a scientific consensus that informed state interests by reducing uncertainty. However, in 1988...

  • Did COP21 seize last chance to halt climate change? Halliwell, James // Grocer;12/12/2015, p14 

    The article discusses the United Nations (UN) initiative to stop the climate change including asking member countries to sign a legally binding deal promising to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to maintain the global average temperatures below 2 degrees centigrade.

  • Climate Change and Environmental Security: For Whom the Discourse Shifts. Detraz, Nicole; Betsill, Michele M. // International Studies Perspectives;Aug2009, Vol. 10 Issue 3, p303 

    This article explores the implications of the April 2007 United Nations Security debate on the security dimensions of a changing climate for international climate change politics. Specifically, our analysis focuses on whether and how security concerns have been addressed in past international...

  • What will CCS demonstrations demonstrate? Russell, Stewart; Markusson, Nils; Scott, Vivian // Mitigation & Adaptation Strategies for Global Change;Jun2012, Vol. 17 Issue 6, p651 

    The article focuses on the carbon capture and storage (CCS) systems. It says that the CCS demonstration of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2005 has provided large commercial or demonstration CCS projects in planning or operation. It also mentions that the slow progress of...

  • Advantages of a polycentric approach to climate change policy. Cole, Daniel H. // Nature Climate Change;Feb2015, Vol. 5 Issue 2, p114 

    Lack of progress in global climate negotiations has led scholars to reconsider polycentric approaches to climate policy. Several examples of subglobal mechanisms to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions have been touted, but it remains unclear why they might achieve better climate outcomes than global...

  • Emergence of polycentric climate governance and its future prospects. Jordan, Andrew J.; Huitema, Dave; Hildén, Mikael; van Asselt, Harro; Rayner, Tim J.; Schoenefeld, Jonas J.; Tosun, Jale; Forster, Johanna; Boasson, Elin L. // Nature Climate Change;Nov2015, Vol. 5 Issue 11, p977 

    The international climate regime represented by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change has been widely critiqued. However, 'new' dynamic forms of climate governing are appearing in alternative domains, producing a more polycentric pattern. Some analysts believe that the new...

  • The Global Governance of Climate Change: G7, G20, and UN Leadership. Westoby, Marie // Political Studies Review;May2017, Vol. 15 Issue 2, p280 

    No abstract available.

  • ON MELTING SUMMITS: THE LIMITATIONS OF FIELD-CONFIGURING EVENTS AS CATALYSTS OF CHANGE IN TRANSNATIONAL CLIMATE POLICY. SCHÜSSLER, ELKE; RÜLING, CHARLES-CLEMENS; WITTNEBEN, BETTINA B. F. // Academy of Management Journal;Feb2014, Vol. 57 Issue 1, p140 

    Although field-configuring events have been highlighted as catalysts of institutional change, scholars still know little about the specific conditions that allow such change to occur. Using data from a longitudinal study of United Nations climate conferences, we analyze how regular and...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics