TITLE

ES Cell Research: In the Shadow of the Ban

AUTHOR(S)
Johnston, Josephine
PUB. DATE
March 2004
SOURCE
Hastings Center Report;Mar/Apr2004, Vol. 34 Issue 2, p49
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Speculates the reason behind the national and international interest in human embryonic stem (ES) cells despite the U.S. ban on federal funding of such research. Details on how to procure ES cells; Requirement of the government for ES cell research funds.
ACCESSION #
12989154

 

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