TITLE

College Programs for Inmates: The Post-Pell Grant Era

AUTHOR(S)
Messemer, Jonathan E.
PUB. DATE
March 2003
SOURCE
Journal of Correctional Education;Mar2003, Vol. 54 Issue 1, p32
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
When the Federal government passed the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, inmates were no longer permitted to use Pell grant money to pay for college tuition while in prison. Therefore, many educators suggested that the ban on Pell grants for inmates would end most prison college programs throughout the United States. After an extensive review of the literature, no studies were found which addressed the impact the ban on Pell grants had regarding inmate college programs. The purpose of this study was to determine which level of college degree programs were being offered to inmates, how the programs were being funded, and how numerous descriptive variables impacted the offering of college programs to inmates. A survey was mailed to the State Correctional Education Director in each of the 50 states. This study had a response rate of 90% (n=45). The results from this study found that 25 states offered in-house college programs to inmates. They utilized the following six sources of funding: (1) State and Federal government, (2) corporations/organizations, (3) non-profit foundations, (4) colleges/ universities, (5) prison budgets, and (6) some inmate support. Finally, this study suggests that the level of a state's population and the rate of higher education attained by the people who resided within that state were statistically significant factors in determining whether or not a state provided in-house college programs to inmates.
ACCESSION #
13671497

 

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