TITLE

Meeting Our First Enemy in the Heat

AUTHOR(S)
HENRY, CHARLES D.
PUB. DATE
March 2019
SOURCE
Infantry;Spring2019, p33
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses on the climate challenges faced by the army after the deployment from the plane as the changes can be sensed of the temperature, and the dryness or humidity of the air. Topics include adapting to a hotter environment that is either dryer or wetter; and discusses patterns of heat adaptation which are one for desert and altitude dryness, the other for jungle humidity. Article also explores the difference in the dangers between dry and humid heat.
ACCESSION #
136833546

 

Related Articles

  • ASK MHQ. Looby, John; Towson, Alan // MHQ: Quarterly Journal of Military History;Winter2008, Vol. 20 Issue 2, p6 

    The article answers a question on whether the French forces could have prevailed if the Germans had gone with their first plan rather than the revised thrust through the Ardennes in 1940. It cites the four deployment directives, or operations plans, launched by Germany in the West after the...

  • Platoon Dispatched on Second Deployment to Iraq. Gordon, Jack // Warrior Citizen;Summer2009, Vol. 54 Issue 3, p34 

    The article reports on the deployment of the 14th Quartermaster Co. unit of the U.S. Army Reserve to support the Operation Iraqi Freedom.

  • Trapping Ourselves in Afghanistan and Losing Focus on the Essential Mission. Peters, Ralph // JFQ: Joint Force Quarterly;2009 3rd Quarter, Issue 54, p63 

    In this article the author analyzes the deployment of more U.S. soldiers in Afghanistan. He states that this issue demonstrates that the U.S. is losing its main mission which is to capture the al Qaeda forces. He believes that the deployment of more soldiers only shows that the U.S. is...

  • Letters. Dillard, Doug; CURRIE, JAMES T.; KENNEDY JR., EDWIN; CUYKENDALL, CLYDIA J.; HEWITT III, JOHN L.; MEDINA, FRANK; SIMONSON, EUGENE M. // Army Magazine;Feb2015, Vol. 65 Issue 2, p4 

    Several letters to the editor are presented in response to articles in previous issues including "Special Operations for the 21st Century: Starting Over," "Fewer Deployments Create Budget Challenges," and "Viewing the Civil War Through the Paradoxical Trinity" in the in the December 2014 issue.

  • Military Trucks Revisited (I). Bianchi, Fulvio // Military Technology;Dec2005, Vol. 29 Issue 12, p103 

    The article focuses on the significance of the preparation and availability of sufficient transport assets to military operations in the armed forces. Logistic support assets are being subjected to heavier use in deployment operations in faraway stations engaging in peace support and enforcement...

  • Editorial. Barnard, Stephen // Military Technology;2008, Vol. 32 Issue 4, p75 

    The author reflects on the challenges in developing light and medium armoured vehicles. He asserts that platform, system and sub-system manufacturers have looked for ways to balance the conflicting requirements of these vehicles such as mobility, protection and firepower. Further, he suggests...

  • PREPARATION.  // PS: Preventive Maintenance Monthly;Aug2003, Issue 609, p1 

    Successful sports teams are fond of saying that "the best offense is a good defense". That translates to winning on another field, the battlefield—if the enemy can't beat the defense, he's not going to win any battles. One must toughen up the defense for the battlefield by doing...

  • Securing the Freedom of Movement of Deployed Forces. Donaldson, Peter // Military Technology;2010, Vol. 34 Issue 6, p110 

    The article discusses the security of freedom of movement of Western armed forces deployed in operations and challenges affecting their tactical mobility. It explores the threat of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) that slows down military convoys and affects how soldiers established...

  • M18 Dry Support Bridge.  // Military Technology;2007, Vol. 31 Issue 7, p32 

    The article features the M18 Dry Support Bridge (DSB), which has raised the standard for deployment of bridges in vast military situations. Its missions were to lay on main supply routes to cross military traffic in the rear of the area of direct combat and to support and maintain the momentum...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics