TITLE

SOURCES OF ENERGY

PUB. DATE
January 2005
SOURCE
World Almanac for Kids;2005, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Almanac
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article looks at sources of energy on Earth. Fuels are called 'fossil' because they were formed from ancient plants and animals. The three basic fossil fuels are coal, oil, and natural gas. Most of the energy we use today comes from these sources. All fossil fuels have one problem: they are gradually getting used up. There are special problems about oil, because industrial countries must often import lots of it and can become greatly dependent on other countries for their supply. Nuclear power is created by releasing energy stored in the nucleus of an atom. Many countries today use nuclear energy. Nuclear power does cause some safety concerns. An accident at Chernobyl in Ukraine in 1986 led to the deaths of thousands of people. Water power is energy that comes from the force of falling or fast-flowing water. People have used wind as energy for a long time. Windmills were popular in Europe during the Middle Ages. Geothermal energy is heat from the Earth. Burning wood and straw (materials known as biomass) is probably the oldest way of producing energy. Recently, a biomass power plant was opened in Burlington, Vermont. It turns wood chips, solid waste, and switchgrass into a substance similar to natural gas. Energy directly from sunlight is a promising new technology. Solar energy is friendly to the environment.
ACCESSION #
13988856

 

Related Articles

  • SOURCES OF ENERGY.  // World Almanac for Kids;2003, p62 

    There are many sources of energy. Fuels are called "fossil" because they were formed from ancient plants and animals. The three basic fossil fuels are coal, oil, and natural gas. Most of the energy we use today comes from these sources. All fossil fuels have one problem: they are gradually...

  • WILL WE HAVE ENOUGH ENERGY?  // World Almanac for Kids;2001, p66 

    In 1998, most of the energy used in the United States came from fossil fuels (about 38.8% from petroleum, 23.2% from natural gas, and 22.9% from coal). The rest came mostly from hydropower (water power) and nuclear energy. Fossil fuels are non renewable sources of energy. That means the amount...

  • Exploitation of Renewable Energy Sources and Its Legal Regulation. Boyu Zhu // Journal of Sustainable Development;2010, Vol. 3 Issue 1, p116 

    There is great potential for exploitation of renewable energy sources in China, but the strength of policy support and stimulation measures is far from enough. Many practices in foreign countries to lead and standardize development of renewable energy sources can be used as sources of reference...

  • Alternative energy sources.  // History of Science & Technology;2004, p680 

    The article focuses on several alternative energy sources. Several alternative energy sources are now in use to lessen global warming induced by carbon dioxide from fossil fuels. Water power uses efficient turbines. However, this energy source interferes with the natural ecology of rivers. There...

  • 100 percent renewables: The resources are there, says UN Report.  // Chemical Business;Jun2011, Vol. 25 Issue 6, p21 

    The article deals with the expected contribution of renewable energy sources to global energy supply by 2050, according to a report published by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The report covers wind, solar, biomass, geothermal, hydro and ocean energy, and also tackles...

  • The True Free Market Choice. Juhl, Dan; Wasserman, Harvey // Solar Today;Mar/Apr2005, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p54 

    Asserts that wind power, solar panels and biomass generators are cheaper than the fossil-nuke alternatives when all associated costs are considered. Added advantages of economic benefits provided by wind and solar; Ancillary cost of fossil fuels that significantly increase their true price;...

  • Will We Have Enough ENERGY?  // World Almanac for Kids;2000, p70 

    In 1997, most of the energy used in the United States came from fossil fuels (about 38% from petroleum, 24% from natural gas, and 24% from coal). The rest came mostly from hydropower (water power) and nuclear energy. Fossil fuels are nonrenewable sources of energy. That means the amount of...

  • SOURCES OF ENERGY.  // World Almanac for Kids;2004, p62 

    The article looks at sources of energy on Earth. Fuels are called 'fossil' because they were formed from ancient plants and animals. The three basic fossil fuels are coal, oil, and natural gas. Most of the energy we use today comes from these sources. All fossil fuels have one problem: they...

  • The Grass Is Greener in 2009. SIEGEL, JEFF // Equities;Jan2009, Vol. 58 Issue 1, p20 

    The article focuses on the need to reevaluate the renewable energy sector in 2009 in order to capitalize on what continues to be one of the greatest investment opportunities of the 21st century. In 2009, continued momentum in algal biodiesel and electrification are expected. The article...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics