TITLE

Bio-Piracy

PUB. DATE
March 2004
SOURCE
Water Garden Journal;Spring2004, Vol. 19 Issue 1, p37
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on bio-piracy, the raiding of third world countries for the value of their plants and animals. Brazilian government's requirement for plant and fish collectors to have a permit before collecting and exporting novel specimens; Pharmaceutical companies' compensation of tribes for information regarding the medicinal uses of local plants; European Patent Office's revoked of a patent on the use of neem, a plant extract with insecticidal and fungicidal properties.
ACCESSION #
14601355

 

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