TITLE

A TRADE POLICY FOR NATIONAL DEFENSE

AUTHOR(S)
Bidwell, Percy W.; Upgren, Arthur R.
PUB. DATE
January 1941
SOURCE
Foreign Affairs;Jan1941, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p282
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on use of financial and economic strength for the defense of the U.S. interests. Any plan for safeguarding an area from the restriction of barter and bilateral trading should logically with the U.S. improving its trade relation with Canada and the Caribbean countries. The volume of trade might be increased by reducing import duties and enlarging tariff quotas on Canadian dairy products and cattle. The United States already occupies a preponderant position in the trade of Mexico and the entire Caribbean region. Many of the principal products of this region are complementary rather than competitive with the U.S. agricultural products. The logical next step in enlarging the area where multilateral trading might be carried on would seem to be the addition of the remaining countries of South America. Economically, the addition of southern South America would seem to complicate rather than simplify the U.S. trading problem. In order to be effective a bloc must meet two tests. Firstly, its basic industries must be reasonably supplementary as evidenced by an active intra-regional trade. Secondly it must be able to furnish from internal resources most of the raw materials essential to modern industry and modern military defense.
ACCESSION #
14778863

 

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