TITLE

WHEN WORLDS COLLIDE

AUTHOR(S)
Barnes, Julian E.
PUB. DATE
November 2004
SOURCE
U.S. News & World Report;11/1/2004, Vol. 137 Issue 15, p41
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
For American soldiers in Iraq, it can seem like two separate worlds. One is marked by the ever present danger of roadside bombs. These attacks embitter or disillusion some soldiers and have made the main supply routes some of the most dangerous places in the world. But off the highways and away from contested urban centers, particularly in the small villages on the outskirts of Baghdad, soldiers are making progress. They are invited into Iraqis' homes for tea and for iftar feasts, when Muslims break their daily Ramadan fast after sundown. Though the work moves slowly, they are pushing forward on small projects--like irrigation pumps and neighborhood councils--intended to boost the economy and rebuild local government. Even in the less violent parts of Iraq, the chaos on the roads is never far away. There are many here who expect that the violence will continue for years. But some young officers think that if the bombings, kidnappings, and ambushes are ever to end, it will require a continued effort to build up relationships wherever they can--even as the fighting rages nearby.
ACCESSION #
14812555

 

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