TITLE

Money worries rank high for most veterinarians

AUTHOR(S)
Verdon, Daniel R.
PUB. DATE
December 2004
SOURCE
DVM: The Newsmagazine of Veterinary Medicine;Dec2004, Vol. 35 Issue 12, p19
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on an exclusive DVM Newsmagazine survey which asked veterinarians "how they feel" about their personal financial footing. Almost two-thirds of veterinarian respondents say they worry about having enough money. The other 38 percent of practitioners say they "have enough to live comfortably." Results address compensation and benefits. Some gender differences also emerge. The survey sougt to measure what was causing veterinarians the most significant financial angst. "Retire some day" rated overwhelming the highest of all categories for both sexes. INSETS: Series took 'alot of help from our friends';Practice characteristics methodology.
ACCESSION #
15285422

 

Related Articles

  • Journal abstracts.  // Social Security Bulletin;Summer92, Vol. 55 Issue 2, p83 

    Presents an abstract of the article entitled `Pension Benefits and Male-Female Wage Differentials,' by James E. Pesando et al, published in the August 1991 edition of the periodical `Canadian Journal of Economics.'

  • Minorities and women still paid less.  // Jet;05/12/97, Vol. 91 Issue 25, p39 

    Reports that minorities and women are paid less than men. Data from the United States Census Bureau; Details.

  • PAY AND PRODUCTIVITY DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MALE AND FEMALE VETERINARIANS. Smith, David M. // ILR Review;Apr2002, Vol. 55 Issue 3, p493 

    The author uses data from annual wage surveys conducted in 1994 and 1995 by Medical Economics Research Group to study differences in pay and productivity between male and female veterinarians in the wage-salary sector. The gender gap in average earnings was 15%. When controls for various...

  • Gender Differences in Pension Wealth: Estimates Using Provider Data. Johnson, Richard W.; Sambamoorthi, Usha // Gerontologist;Jun99, Vol. 39 Issue 3, p320 

    Presents information on a study which examined gender differences in pension wealth at midlife using data from pension providers in the United States. Differences in earnings and pension wealth between men and women in the United States; Methods; Results; Discussion.

  • Differences in Pay Between Men and Women Workers. McNulty, Donald J. // Monthly Labor Review;Dec67, Vol. 90 Issue 12, p40 

    Presents study findings focused on differences in pay between men and women workers. Assessment of information obtained from surveys of occupational earnings and related practices conducted in metropolitan areas by the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics; Differences by establishments.

  • Gender, Influence Tactics, and Job Characteristics Preferences: New Insights into Salary Determination. Thacker, Rebecca A. // Sex Roles;May95, Vol. 32 Issue 9-10, p617 

    Investigates whether gender retains its significance as a predictor of salary, after controlling the well-documented influences of human capital accumulation and job level, and the less well-researched effects of both influence tactics and job characteristic preferences. Necessity of including...

  • Some like Sipps hot. Baskeyfield, Angela // Money Marketing;3/21/2002, p70 

    Discusses the importance of long-term financial planning among women. Result of a study on the difference in pension ownership between men and women; Attitude of women toward financial planning; Source of financial advice for women; Benefit of a Sipp financial product to women.

  • EtTu, Europe? More Bad News for Female Planners. Scofidio, Barbara // Medical Meetings;Jul/Aug2004, Vol. 31 Issue 5, p46 

    Presents information on a survey conducted by Meeting Professionals International's Women's Leadership Initiative concerning the wage gap between men and women in the meeting planning industry. Percentage of women who felt forced to make choices between career and family; Comments from Cary...

  • Sourballs.  // Working Mother;Apr99, p8 

    Criticizes the telecommunications industry for the disparity in the salaries of men and women in technical jobs. Survey statistics cited; Disparity in educational achievements of men and women surveyed.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics