TITLE

Will We Have Enough ENERGY?

PUB. DATE
January 2000
SOURCE
World Almanac for Kids;2000, p70
SOURCE TYPE
Almanac
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
In 1997, most of the energy used in the United States came from fossil fuels (about 38% from petroleum, 24% from natural gas, and 24% from coal). The rest came mostly from hydropower (water power) and nuclear energy. Fossil fuels are nonrenewable sources of energy. That means the amount of fossil fuel available for use is limited and that all this fuel might get used up after many years. Scientists are trying to find more sources of energy that will reduce pollution and save some of the fossil fuels: Solar power, water from the ocean, the wind, biomass energy and geothermal energy.
ACCESSION #
15564600

 

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