TITLE

Journalism's role: unresolved issues

PUB. DATE
January 1964
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;Winter1964, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on issues surrounding media coverage of the assassination of U.S. President John F. Kennedy. Errors and rumors about the condition of U.S. Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson spread through wire services following the assassination. Such rumors resulted from the lack of information from the government. This caused reporters to cover the story like a natural catastrophe. Perhaps another issue dealt with the management of mob of reporters and technicians who covered the event. Mismanagement of mob could result in changes in news being covered. It could interfere with other processes taking place in the public interest. Finally, the assassination revealed the performance of journalism. The event testifies that journalism is developing a firmness of style, a sureness in taste that will enhance its reputation and value.
ACCESSION #
16275547

 

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