TITLE

The True Free Market Choice

AUTHOR(S)
Juhl, Dan; Wasserman, Harvey
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
Solar Today;Mar/Apr2005, Vol. 19 Issue 2, p54
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Asserts that wind power, solar panels and biomass generators are cheaper than the fossil-nuke alternatives when all associated costs are considered. Added advantages of economic benefits provided by wind and solar; Ancillary cost of fossil fuels that significantly increase their true price; Efforts of the so-called free market conservatives in U.S. Congress to advance an energy bill that would allot billions to promote the use of increasingly scarce fossil fuels and problematic nuclear energy; Comparison between nuclear energy and wind.
ACCESSION #
16309170

 

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