TITLE

These stem cells are animal-free

AUTHOR(S)
Coghlan, Andy
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
New Scientist;3/19/2005, Vol. 185 Issue 2491, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article informs that one of the hurdles to using human embryonic stem cells to treat disease has been overcome. Now, Paul De Sousa and his team at the Roslin Institute in Scotland, where Dolly the sheep was cloned, have produced what they say are the first animal-free ESCs. Another team led by Carlos Simón of the IVI Foundation in Valencia, Spain, announced in Edinburgh that they have used very similar techniques to generate two new cultures of human embryonic stem cells. The only difference was that Simón's team grew the stem cells on human placental skin-like cells rather than the foreskin cells used by De Sousa.
ACCESSION #
16616762

 

Related Articles

  • Just Cloning Around. Lemonick, Michael D.; Bjerklie, David // Time;12/10/2001, Vol. 158 Issue 25, p75 

    Focuses on the achievement of scientists at Advanced Cell Technology in Massachusetts to grow embryonic human cells through cloning. Response from pro-life politicians; How publicity for the company may either bring investment or cause an anti-cloning backlash; View of medical director Dr....

  • Just Cloning Around. Lemonick, Michael D.; Bjerklie, David // Time International (South Pacific Edition);12/10/2001, Issue 49, p81 

    Focuses on the achievement of scientists at Advanced Cell Technology in Massachusetts to grow embryonic human cells through cloning. Response from pro-life politicians; How publicity for the company may either bring investment or cause an anti-cloning backlash; View of medical director Dr....

  • Substrates and supplements for hESCs: a critical review. Crocco, Melisa; Fratnz, Nilo; Bos-Mikich, Adriana // Journal of Assisted Reproduction & Genetics;Mar2013, Vol. 30 Issue 3, p315 

    Background: Different laboratories around the world have succeeded in establishing human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines. However, culture conditions vary considerably among the protocols used and the vast majority of the lines at some stage of their creation have been in contact with an animal...

  • The Tiniest Transplant. Park, Alice // Time International (Atlantic Edition);8/22/2011, Vol. 178 Issue 7, p36 

    The article presents a discussion of embryonic stem cell treatment therapies, adapted from the book "The Stem Cell Hope," by Alice Park.

  • Stem cell therapy takes a giant leap.  // New Scientist;8/23/2008, Vol. 199 Issue 2670, p5 

    The author reflects on the use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to repair damaged spinal cords, hearts, livers, bones and pancreas.

  • European panel rejects creation of human embryos for research. Dickson, David // Nature;11/16/2000, Vol. 408 Issue 6810, p277 

    Reports that a European committee has ruled that approving creation of human embryos for stem-cell research would be premature. Opinion of the European Group on Ethics in Science that somatic-cell nuclear transfer has potential medical value; Expectation that the report will impact European...

  • Embryonic Stem cell research - The case against... Antoniou, Michael // Nature Medicine;Apr2001, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p397 

    Advocates against therapeutic use of and research on human embryonic stem (ES) cells. Practical issues associated with the cloning of ES cells; Safety involved in the usage of adult cells; Moral and ethical issues that needs to be addressed regarding therapeutic cloning of ES cells.

  • Tell Me More.  // Countdown;Spring2003, Vol. 24 Issue 1, p40 

    Presents a round table discussion on juvenile diabetes in reference to the experience of three children. Link between steep spikes in blood sugar levels and long-term complications during childhood; Role of embryonic stem cells in the cure of type 1 diabetes; Advice to parents to help their...

  • Stem Cells Found to Heal Damaged Artery in Lab Study. Perry, R. Michael // Cryonics;Apr2013, Vol. 34 Issue 4, p24 

    The article offers information on the study which revealed how damaged artery can be healed by baboon embryonic stem cells.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of NEW JERSEY STATE LIBRARY

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics