TITLE

An Easy Guide to Pickenese

AUTHOR(S)
Acker, Katherine
PUB. DATE
March 2005
SOURCE
South Carolina Review;Spring2005, Vol. 37 Issue 2, p176
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents information on Pickens, a small town in South Carolina and throws light on its colorful and eccentric use of the English language. According to the author, the town has many charming attributes that only a true resident can really appreciate. Although the author was not born in Pickens, she learnt nuances of the local languages from her friends. The author cites certain words and phrases, which she considers as a glimpse into the great expanse of the language of the town.
ACCESSION #
17036883

 

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