TITLE

Ancient China Timeline

AUTHOR(S)
McGill, Sara Ann
PUB. DATE
August 2017
SOURCE
Ancient China Timeline;8/1/2017, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a chronology of significant events in the history of China, from 4000 BC to 1949 AD. Accomplishments of the Shang, Chou, Han, and other dynasties; Impact of the Ming Dynasty on Chinese government; Foreign and domestic affairs during the Manchu Dynasty period; Eventual collapse of the dynastic system of government.
ACCESSION #
17955844

 

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