TITLE

Wider choices

PUB. DATE
June 2005
SOURCE
World of Irish Nursing & Midwifery;Jun2005, Vol. 13 Issue 6, p51
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Presents a summary of contraceptive alternatives for Irish women. Cornerstone of effective contraception; Information on combined oral contraceptive pill; Description of NuvaRing; Overview of the long-term intrauterine device.
ACCESSION #
18158398

 

Related Articles

  • Women's Health: New contraceptive options. Shulman, Lee P.; Nucatola, Deborah; Kaunitz, Andrew M. // Patient Care for the Nurse Practitioner;Oct2004, Vol. 7 Issue 10, p1 

    The article offers information on several birth control options. A range of birth control options provide convenience and safety and offer women more choices, including extended-use options, oral contraceptive regimens with noncontraceptive benefits, a transdermal hormone patch, a...

  • Efficacy and safety of herbal spermicidal contraceptive, Consap. Bhosale, Vivek V.; Asthana, O. P.; Gaur, S. P. S. // Current Science (00113891);6/25/2013, Vol. 104 Issue 12, p1701 

    Consap is a locally acting, non-hormonal, herbal spermicidal contraceptive isolated from Sapindus mukorosii. It has been observed to be free from systemic side-effects such as nausea, vomiting and irregularities in the menstrual cycle. It is a woman-controlled reversible method which needs to be...

  • Continuous-Use Ethinylestradiol/Levonorgestrel 20μg/90μg as an Oral Contraceptive. Bednarek, Paula // Drugs;2007, Vol. 67 Issue 16, p2478 

    The article relates the author's perspective on the use of Ethinylestradiol/Levonorgestrel 20µgram/90µgram as an oral contraceptive. She remarks that the contraceptive is the first combination oral hormonal contraceptive for continuous daily use, without hormone-free days or placebo. She...

  • Birth control with benefits. Patz, Aviva // Redbook;Aug2010, Vol. 215 Issue 2, p93 

    The article focuses on birth control options with health benefits. It is mentioned that Mirena hormonal intrauterine device (IUD) is placed in uterus to block fertilization of eggs and releases low doses of a hormone called levonorgestrel that can reduce superheavy periods. It is stated that the...

  • Safety of a New Oral Contraceptive Containing Drospirenone. Heinemann, Lothar A.J.; Dinger, Jürgen // Drug Safety;2004, Vol. 27 Issue 13, p1001 

    New chemical entities must undergo rigorous, and preferably independent, safety and efficacy assessments before entry into the market. This is also true for oral contraceptives (OCs) given their extensive usage by healthy women and the safety concerns highlighted by the so-called ‘third...

  • OCs and IUDs: A challenge to modern GYN care. Kistner, Robert W. // RN;Sep76, Vol. 39 Issue 9, p55 

    Provides an overview of the adverse effects of oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices. Gynecologic problems that have developed; Characteristics of the complications.

  • Prospects in reversible contraception.  // British Medical Journal;7/17/1976, Vol. 2 Issue 6028, p131 

    Focuses on the development of oral contraceptives and intrauterine devices (IUD) to regulate fertility in the United States. Application of copper wire in IUD to form a pharmacologically active device; Development of progestogen-releasing device; Introduction of intracervical device to control...

  • History and Efficacy of Emergency Contraception: Beyond Coca-Cola. Ellertson, Charlotte // Family Planning Perspectives;Mar/Apr96, Vol. 28 Issue 2, p44 

    The article presents information on the history and effectiveness of emergency contraceptives that are used to reduce the chances of pregnancy. Most contraceptives were used during sexual intercourse, while a few were also used within a short time after unprotected intercourse. Methods such as...

  • Contraception Choices in Women with Underlying Medical Conditions. BONNEMA, RACHEL A.; McNAMARA, MEGAN C.; SPENCER, ABBY L. // American Family Physician;9/15/2010, Vol. 82 Issue 6, p621 

    Primary care physicians often prescribe contraceptives to women of reproductive age with comorbidities. Novel delivery systems (e.g., contraceptive patch, contraceptive ring, single-rod implantable device) may change traditional risk and benefit profiles in women with comorbidities. Effective...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics