TITLE

Brain imaging ready to detect terrorists, say neuroscientists

AUTHOR(S)
Wild, Jennifer
PUB. DATE
September 2005
SOURCE
Nature;9/22/2005, Vol. 437 Issue 7058, p457
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Reports on the claim of researchers concerning the reliability of brain-imaging techniques to identify criminals in the U.S. Use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to track people's brains; Design of MRI; Importance of funding to standardize the MRI method.
ACCESSION #
18373142

 

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