TITLE

Classifying Curriculum Theories: Implications for Educators

AUTHOR(S)
Walker, Decker F.
PUB. DATE
October 1982
SOURCE
Education Digest;Oct1982, Vol. 48 Issue 2, p45
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the implications related to classifying curriculum theories in the U.S. One type rationalizes curriculum programs, proposing content, aims, and approaches to education-in short, proposing a program. A second type of curriculum theory rationalizes procedures for curriculum construction or curriculum determination, rather than rationalizing the program itself. A great many curriculum writers have developed step-by-step procedures for every aspect of curriculum planning, development, and evaluation. A third type of curriculum theory conceptualizes curricular phenomena. This type is more removed from the immediate task of curriculum making. This diversity is not likely ever to vanish because each type of theory takes its own vantage point, each of these vantage points has validity and importance for some situations, and each appeals to some consumers. Curriculum theories are verified in substantial part by careful, systematic application to cases. Curriculum theories seem to treat value questions in one of two ways. Either the theorist builds the theory on values espoused by some and rejected by others, or else the theorist seeks to build on values so widely shared as to constitute a virtual consensus. Those who are involved in curriculum would be well advised to devote much attention to the careful, critical application of theories to important cases.
ACCESSION #
18831414

 

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