TITLE

Higher Standards?

PUB. DATE
September 1985
SOURCE
Education Digest;Sep1985, Vol. 51 Issue 1, p65
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports that a series of classroom studies by Richard Ryan, assistant professor of psychology at the University of Rochester, New York, of elementary, high school and college students conducted since 1978 indicates that teachers told to get students to perform to higher standards on tests tend to adopt a controlling style in the classroom, causing the teachers to talk, direct, evaluate and criticize more and causing students to show less intrinsic motivation to think of themselves as less competent than their peers and to feel less good about themselves than those in other classrooms. Children in controlling classrooms really do significantly better on the standardized tests, either.
ACCESSION #
18918505

 

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