TITLE

Social Promotion--a Misnomer?

AUTHOR(S)
Kumpf, Carl H.
PUB. DATE
September 1961
SOURCE
Education Digest;Sep1961, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p12
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article presents information on the process of social promotion in the U.S. There are far too many educators and laymen who interpret social promotion to mean the annual movement of children from grade to grade with little or no effort being expended by the child. This notion assumes that all a child need do is live for a year and he automatically advances a grade. The harm results because resistance has grown to any promotional plan which suggests that the student did not earn his promotion. Social promotion, 100 percent promotion, continuous progress, and other such plans for grouping children are becoming suspect by the reactionaries who feel that only achievement of grade standards can serve as a sound basis for promotion. A few have seized on one small aspect of attempts to individualize instruction, labeled it social promotion, and made an unwarranted simplification of the many-sided process engaged in by most schools in the education and classification of children. For a long time, the curriculum was a collection of subjects, with each subject subdivided into blocks or grade expectancies. Administrators and teachers then set arbitrary levels of achievement for each block, levels the child had to reach before moving on to the next higher grade. These levels, arbitrary because no two schools interpreted them alike, were commonly known as grade standards.
ACCESSION #
18923126

 

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