TITLE

Split Decision

AUTHOR(S)
Bixler, Mark
PUB. DATE
November 2005
SOURCE
Teacher Magazine;Nov/Dec2005, Vol. 17 Issue 3, p9
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports that public schools in the United States are finding new reasons to segregate the sexes. The sexes have been taught separately for centuries, usually in private settings. But recent research on gender-specific learning, new federal flexibility, and some eyebrow-raising test-score improvements are forcing public school leaders to rethink the hegemony of coeducational learning. Miami-Dade County Public Schools, the nation's fourth-largest district, plans to launch the state's first completely gender-segregated school in 2006: a magnet "leadership academy" for girls in the 6th through the 10th grades, followed by one for boys in 2007-08. The number of public schools offering single-sex instruction has risen from fewer than a dozen to 205 since 1997, with classrooms sprouting up in places such as Atlanta, New York, and Philadelphia, says Leonard Sax, a psychologist and physician who directs the National Association for Single Sex Public Education, in Maryland. The increase is directly attributable to the 2001 No Child Left Behind Act, which introduced new flexibility to Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972.
ACCESSION #
18977208

 

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