TITLE

Johnson's Influence on Webster and Worcester in Early American Lexicography

AUTHOR(S)
Landau, Sidney I.
PUB. DATE
June 2005
SOURCE
International Journal of Lexicography;Jun2005, Vol. 18 Issue 2, p217
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Always competitive, Webster sought to supplant Johnson as the preeminent lexicographer of the English language. This paper, focusing on the treatment of a few representative phrasal verbs, concludes that both Webster's and Worcester's early dictionaries followed Johnson's closely, but Webster demonstrated more originality and introduced innovations in methodology that anticipated mainstream dictionary practice in twentieth-century America.
ACCESSION #
20171755

 

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