TITLE

Writing in a Minor Key

AUTHOR(S)
Watkins, Susan
PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
Doris Lessing Studies;Winter2006, Vol. 25 Issue 2, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article explores the concept of minor literature and examines the critical readings of "The Fifth Child," "Mara and Dann" and "Ben, in the World," novels written by Doris Lessing. The characteristics of minor literature are the deterritorialization of language, the connection of the individual to a political immediacy and the collective assemblage of enunciation. "The Fifth Child" was the best received, although its disturbing qualities were often noted. Responses to "Mara and Dann" also suggest similar anxieties about form and content.
ACCESSION #
20343235

 

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