TITLE

Gas-Price Voters Aren't Pumped Up

AUTHOR(S)
Cook, Charlie
PUB. DATE
May 2006
SOURCE
National Journal;5/6/2006, Vol. 38 Issue 18, p84
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the implications of the high gasoline prices for the administration of U.S. President George W. Bush and the Republican Party in the midterm elections in 2006. Few would dispute that if gasoline prices go substantially higher and remain there for a sustained period, they will hurt Bush and damage his party. According to RT Strategies pollster Thom Riehle and his partner, Lance Tarrance, respondents cared about jobs and the economy, the Iraq War and gasoline prices.
ACCESSION #
20819875

 

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