TITLE

Colombia Implodes

AUTHOR(S)
Dettmer, Jamie
PUB. DATE
September 1999
SOURCE
Insight on the News;09/13/99, Vol. 15 Issue 34, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the growing drug production in Colombia, the source country of cocaine and heroin flowing into the United States (US), in September 1999. Impact on the US presidential elections; Information on the military and economic conditions in Colombia; Testimony of General Barry McCaffrey on Colombia's crisis; Role of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) in the crisis; Proposal of counterdrug programs in Colombia by McCaffrey; Reactions to the strategy.
ACCESSION #
2265843

 

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