TITLE

Law and Terror

AUTHOR(S)
Anderson, Kenneth
PUB. DATE
October 2006
SOURCE
Policy Review;Sep/Oct2006, Issue 139, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the need to develop a counterterrorism legislation in the U.S. The administration of President George W. Bush should have been working toward an institutionalized counterterrorism policy. It stresses that the Congress is focused only on the Hamdan versus Rumsfeld case when it seeks to secure a policy on war on terror. The Supreme Court implies its willingness to lessen its role in foreign policy and war if the executive and legislative branches would collaborate.
ACCESSION #
22761796

 

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