TITLE

India moving into Chinese markets

AUTHOR(S)
Laws, Forrest
PUB. DATE
February 2007
SOURCE
Southwest Farm Press;2/7/2007, Vol. 34 Issue 4, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on issues related to the cotton market in India and its exports to China. In 2004, cotton farmers produced about 300 of lint per acre. This figure was increased to 600 pounds of lint per acre with the introduction of Bt cotton variety. In addition, total production rose from 13 million in 2003 to 19 million bales in 2006. Meanwhile, the country's exports have surged to an unexpected 4.25 million bales in 2006-2007, with 2.25 million bales exported to China.
ACCESSION #
23941642

 

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