TITLE

ABCs OF BACKPACKING

AUTHOR(S)
Howe, D. K.
PUB. DATE
May 2007
SOURCE
American Fitness;May/Jun2007, Vol. 25 Issue 3, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents tips on the use of backpacks by children. According to the North American Spine Society (NASS), 42.6 percent of their members have treated children or teens suffering from back pain and spinal trauma caused by backpacks, ranging from thoracic and lumbar strain to spondylolysis, a stress fracture in one of the vertebrae. NASS members recommend that the pack should weigh no more than 10 to 15 percent of the child's body weight.
ACCESSION #
24981660

 

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