TITLE

Gurkhas to Go

AUTHOR(S)
Fathers, Michael; Adhikary, Dhruba; Brunton, Michael
PUB. DATE
November 1999
SOURCE
Time International (South Pacific Edition);11/29/99, Issue 48, p40
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on recruitment of the Gurkhas, an mercenary army made up of men from the Himalaya region of Nepal. Description of the army's strict and intensive selection process; Its strong reputation; History of some of the wars in which Gurkhas have fought; Questions over whether they are adequately and fairly compensated for their services.
ACCESSION #
2535505

 

Related Articles

  • FEMALE GURKHAS GET GREEN LIGHT….  // Personnel Today;6/19/2007, p2 

    The article reports that the British Army's famous Brigade of Gurkhas is planning to recruit Nepalese women into the brigade. According to the British Ministry of Defence, actual induction of women would not take place before 2010. It is informed that there are currently about 3,500 male Gurkha...

  • War Is Heaven.  // Time;Jun1962, Vol. 79 Issue 22, p25 

    The article focuses on the attitude of the Gurkhas concerning war. It states that the Gurkhas were natives of Nepal who chose to fight for the British crown. It also states that the war-loving Gurkhas call war as heaven. According to the author, their bravery in war had made them the first...

  • COLONEL CROSS OF THE GURKHAS. Kaplan, Robert D. // Atlantic;May2006, Vol. 297 Issue 4, p79 

    The article discusses the experience of the author in meeting Colonel John Philip Cross, a retiree of the British Army. The author travelled to Pokhara, Nepal to meet Cross. Cross became a recruiting officer for the Gurkhas in Nepal. Gurkha comes from the British mispronunciation of the town of...

  • Pakistan Army: The String of the Federation. Mehmood Khan, Ehsan // Hilal;Jan2014, Vol. 50 Issue 7, p21 

    The article focuses on the army of Pakistan. The country's army officers corps and a cadre of soldiers are made up of the Sindhi, Punjabi and all other ethno-linguistic communities. The different soldierly characteristics of all the soldiers is noted. The trend of recruiting of the Baloch youth...

  • The Army's other victory.  // Advertising Age;3/11/1991, Vol. 62 Issue 11, p17 

    The article comments on the recruitment campaign of the U.S. Army. The theme "Be all you can be" is appropriate following the ceasefire in the Persian Gulf. The armed services trained their personnel well. Its recruitment of highly qualified people for the all-volunteer service required that...

  • The Armed Services Want Career Men.  // Saturday Evening Post;12/8/1945, Vol. 218 Issue 23, p128 

    The article reflects on the provisions under the Armed Forces Voluntary Enlistment Act in the U.S. The author stresses that there are some military flaws that need to be corrected like doing injustice to men who have given more than their share. He argues that the provision of the law concerning...

  • Diagnosis 2. Cooper, Brian // Marketing (00253650);2/1/2006, p18 

    The article reports that young people in Great Britain feel that the military life is too harsh a career option. Many members of today's trainer-wearing generation don't even know what it is like to wear a pair of boots. The Army needs to present itself in a challenging manner that plays to its...

  • Conscription and the Size of Armed Forces. White, Michael D. // Social Science Quarterly (University of Texas Press);Sep1989, Vol. 70 Issue 3, p772 

    The extent to which the use of conscription causes countries to maintain larger armed forces is examined. The size of armed forces is estimated for a sample of 143 countries, using a simultaneous model with the use of conscription an endogenous variable. The results indicate that the use of...

  • ENLISTMENT RATES FOR MILITARY SERVICE AND UNEMPLOYMENT. Hause, John C. // Journal of Human Resources;Winter73, Vol. 8 Issue 1, p98 

    This article examines the theoretical discussion of the way that the unemployment rate might effect the enlistment decision in the United States from 1957 to 1963. He assumes that it operates by reflecting the anticipated probability of obtaining civilian employment, and that this probability...

Share

Read the Article

Other Topics