TITLE

Administrative Claims Analysis of New Exenatide Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

AUTHOR(S)
Wade, Ron; Quimbo, Ralph; Barron, John; Schroeder, Brock; Wintle, Matthew; Misurski, Derek; Oglesby, Alan
PUB. DATE
June 2007
SOURCE
Diabetes;Jun2007 Supplement 1, Vol. 56, pA561
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Traditional antidiabetic therapies often fail to maintain glycemic control over time. In this retrospective analysis using a large, national commercial health care claims database, we describe baseline characteristics, comorbidities, and concomitant therapies in patients prescribed exenatide in the first 13 months following FDA approval. A total of 3578 patients were identified who had a prescription claim for exenatide between May 1, 2005 and May 31,2006, ≥12 months of pre-index eligibility (first claim defined as index date), and were ≥18 years old. Of these, 3454 patients (96.5%) had a pre-index diagnosis for type 2 diabetes based on diagnosis code and/or meditation use. Mean (±SD) age was 54.24±10.0 years; 49.7% were female and 12.7% were ≥65 years of age. Baseline A1C values obtained within 100 days before the index date were available for 340 patients (mean±SD = 8.04±1.6%). The most common comorbidities associated with diabetes reported in the 12 months prior to the index date were dyslipidemia (87.7%), hypertension (64.3%), other cardiovascular disease (27.7%), and obesity (17.7%). Most patients analyzed (94.2%) were treated with at least one other antidiabetic medication at baseline; 22.1% with one drug, 34.3% with 2 drugs, and 37.8% with ≥3 drugs. Metformin was the most common baseline therapy (74.5%), followed by thiazolidinediones (50.6%), sulfonylureas (49.0%), and insulin (29.7%). This study provides the first nonclinical trial population analysis of the baseline A1C, demographics, comorbidities, and concomitant diabetes therapies in patients initiated on exenatide. The mean baseline A1C indicates that these patients were not achieving glycemic control as defined by current guidelines, supporting the notion that diabetes remains a difficult disease in which to achieve therapeutic goals. In the first 13 months since FDA approval, exenatide was predominantly prescribed to patients with type 2 diabetes who were failing to achieve glycemic control with prior antidiabetic therapy.
ACCESSION #
25822492

 

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