TITLE

The Pirate Hunters

AUTHOR(S)
Raffaele, Paul
PUB. DATE
August 2007
SOURCE
Smithsonian;Aug2007, Vol. 38 Issue 5, p38
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses efforts by law enforcement to stop pirates off the coast of Somalia. Though buccaneering is a huge problem for transport ships sailing around the world, high-tech crafts like the USS Winston S. Churchill are putting a stop to the crime by chasing down pirates with trained military personnel. The author examines the history of pirates since the 14th century B.C., as well as the inner workings of pirate hunting agencies like the Piracy Reporting Centre in Kuala Lumpur.
ACCESSION #
25895266

 

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