TITLE

A History of American Lace and Lacemakers

AUTHOR(S)
Allgeier, Gretchen
PUB. DATE
January 1991
SOURCE
Fiberarts;Jan/Feb91, Vol. 17 Issue 4, p11
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article traces the history of lace and lacemakers in the U.S. In 1630, Ipswich, Massachusetts was founded by English settlers from the Midlands who brought lace techniques to the New World. There were more than 600 lacemakers producing over 42,000 yards of lace in the area by 1790. However, American lacemakers were affected by the War of Independence and the advent of the lace machine. Sybil Carter, an Episcopalian missionary who taught the American Indians the art of lacemaking, helped in the revival of lacemaking as a viable economic trade. In 1903, the Princess Lace Loom was produced by Torchon Lace Company of Saint Louis, Missouri.
ACCESSION #
26467721

 

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