TITLE

Teacher Observation to Assess Student Achievement

AUTHOR(S)
Ediger, Marlow
PUB. DATE
September 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Instructional Psychology;Sep2007, Vol. 34 Issue 3, p137
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Whatever has happened to using teacher observation as an approach to assess student achievement? Presently, the emphasis is upon state mandated testing to ascertain student progress. Much is written in educational journals about having students achieve No Child Left Behind (NCLB) federal and state standards, signed into law in 2002. Much drill is going into students passing mandated tests for grades three through eight, and an exit test in high school to receive a diploma. Schools also need to pass an Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) test. If the latter is not passed two years in a row, then that school will be listed as "failing." Students may then opt out of a failing school and attend a "successful" school at local district expense. This has placed much pressure upon teachers and principals to have students and classes be termed "successful," in meeting NCLB requirements. Learners are then being drilled, particularly, in reading and mathematics. There are even reports of principals pressuring teachers to teach students in these two curriculum areas, only. This leaves out major curriculum areas in teaching and learning.
ACCESSION #
27106212

 

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