TITLE

Banking on offshore

AUTHOR(S)
Wilks, Neil
PUB. DATE
October 2007
SOURCE
Green Futures;Oct2007, Issue 66, p58
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the problems confronting the 15 offshore wind farms in Great Britain. The government approved the project in December 2003 and was expected that these turbines alone could power one in six houses. Since then, none of the 15 wind farms are up and running. Developers of the Sheringham Shoal offshore wind farm has spent a large amount of its effort in trying to gain consent, including the production of comprehensive onshore and offshore environmental impact assessments covering everything from bird life and marine ecology to landscape and vegetation.
ACCESSION #
27502868

 

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