TITLE

MELT DOWN

AUTHOR(S)
Hylton, Wil S.
PUB. DATE
March 2008
SOURCE
GQ: Gentlemen's Quarterly;Mar2008, Vol. 78 Issue 3, p304
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reflects on the nuclear plant at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania. It views on the meltdown of the nuclear industry on March 28, 1979, which accident was described as a nightmare. It discusses the developments of the industry after the accident, and the cases which oppose the building of new nuclear plants.
ACCESSION #
30081366

 

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